vegetable

A listing of Travelvice Compendium posts with the keyword 'vegetable'

Ají Amarillo (Yellow Pepper)

Ají amarillo is the number one pepper used for cooking in Peru. Native to the country, ají amarillo has been used as far back as the Inca times. Many traditional Peruvian dishes are made with it.

Caigua Rellena

Caigua Rellena is a Peruvian dish made of a stuffed vegetable. The word caigua referrers to the a hollow, gourd-like vegetable called caiguas. The word rellena means stuffed or filled.

Camote Morado (Sweet Potato)

Camote Morado is one of several varieties of sweet potato in Peru, available year-round. Camote morado (morado means purple) is one of the most common types found in markets. Its name is often shorted when referenced to camote.

Cancha Serrana (Dehydrated Highland Corn)

Cancha Serrana, commonly referred to as cancha, is a dehydrated variety of corn that comes from the highlands of the Peruvian Andes. Cancha Serrana isn't prepared or eaten like normal corn. Instead of being boiled, it's prepared by frying in an open skillet. Sometimes pieces of pork fat are used while frying pan.

Haba (Broad Bean, Lima Bean)

Habas are a pale green, flattish, edible seed. They are known for their foul smell when boiled—"like soiled diapers" one Peruvian said.

Peruvian Choclo (Maíz, Corn)

Choclo is the Peruvian word for Corn. Robust ears of choclo are yellowish-white, mildly sweet, and sport exceptionally large kernels. This variety of choclo, which is the most prevalent in Peru, is grown exclusively along the coastal region of the country. Choclo is often eaten with meals in Peru without seasoning, but can be found smothered in butter and salt, or sauces (such as in the dish Choclo a la Huancaina).

Spicy Peruvian Peppers: Rocoto

Rocoto is one of the hottest chili peppers in Peru. The pepper contains the same vitamins as regular peppers—such as lots of Vitamin E—but has the benefit of not provoking delicate stomachs. Rocoto is OK to eat when you have ulcers. It's good for the liver, and is said to accelerate metabolism.

Yuca

Yuca is related to potatos and Peruvian olluco (olluquito), though much drier than their cousins. The skin of yuca is rough like the bark of a tree, and bleeds a white juice when punctured. Yuca contains a root in the center that must be removed before serving, and are most commonly prepared by boiling them (peeled) in water, and served with salt.