indigenous

A listing of Travelvice Compendium posts with the keyword 'indigenous'

Ají Amarillo (Yellow Pepper)

Ají amarillo is the number one pepper used for cooking in Peru. Native to the country, ají amarillo has been used as far back as the Inca times. Many traditional Peruvian dishes are made with it.

Caigua Rellena

Caigua Rellena is a Peruvian dish made of a stuffed vegetable. The word caigua referrers to the a hollow, gourd-like vegetable called caiguas. The word rellena means stuffed or filled.

Cancha Serrana (Dehydrated Highland Corn)

Cancha Serrana, commonly referred to as cancha, is a dehydrated variety of corn that comes from the highlands of the Peruvian Andes. Cancha Serrana isn't prepared or eaten like normal corn. Instead of being boiled, it's prepared by frying in an open skillet. Sometimes pieces of pork fat are used while frying pan.

Ceviche de Conchas Negras (Raw Black Shellfish)

Ceviche de Conchas Negras is rumored to be an intense aphrodisiac from the mangroves in the north of Peru. The shells contain ink that's not unlike a squid, which also lends to its name (negra means black). It's of the upmost importance to eat Ceviche de Conchas Negras live, or illness may occur.

Choclo Serrano

Choclo Serrano is a variety of corn from the highlands of Peru. It is smaller and sweeter than typical Peruvian Choclo from the coast. The size and color of the kernels is reminiscent of corns found in the United States.

Inca Kola

Inca Kola, a product of Peru, is the de facto standard for soft drink consumption in the country. It tastes something like a cross between pineapple and bubblegum, and dominates in the country with over 35% of market sales.

Papa a la Huancaína (Huancayo-style Potatoes)

Papa a la Huancaína is a delicious potato-based dish with a creamy, spicy sauce. Typical food from a province in Peru called Huancayo, it's normally served atop a large leaf of lettuce, covered in sauce, and garnished with a half a hard-boiled egg and one black olive.

Peruvian Choclo (Maíz, Corn)

Choclo is the Peruvian word for Corn. Robust ears of choclo are yellowish-white, mildly sweet, and sport exceptionally large kernels. This variety of choclo, which is the most prevalent in Peru, is grown exclusively along the coastal region of the country. Choclo is often eaten with meals in Peru without seasoning, but can be found smothered in butter and salt, or sauces (such as in the dish Choclo a la Huancaina).

Spicy Peruvian Peppers: Rocoto

Rocoto is one of the hottest chili peppers in Peru. The pepper contains the same vitamins as regular peppers—such as lots of Vitamin E—but has the benefit of not provoking delicate stomachs. Rocoto is OK to eat when you have ulcers. It's good for the liver, and is said to accelerate metabolism.